Adventures

“The best way to enjoy what life has to offer is to just get out and do it.”

Life is an adventure. Should you be able to pull yourself away from Boondockers Landing, the following is a list
of suggestions for your next adventure, including activities for the most daring of thrill seekers.



  • Do something wild.  Try something you’ve never done before.  You’ve done the talking, now do the walking.  The adventure may be a life experience and the topic of conversations for years to come.
  • Hunt for Jessie James’ hidden loot.  Interested in the Wild West?  Plenty of exhausting walks in the nearby area of the Ouachita Mountains that will help you sleep at night. Featured on the History Channel.  Explore the expanse that outlaws once roamed and evaded the sheriff and his posse.
  • Wine a bit, you’ll feel better.  Tour Poteau’s winery and vineyard.  Enjoy wine tasting at Girls Gone Wine and make merry (Mary) in Hochatown!  You can even make your own wine, bottle it, cork it, and design your own private label. Your name, what a gift for someone else to treasure.
  • Metal detecting.  Does prospecting run in your veins?   Be sure you, friends or family don’t have any metal implants! Don’t forget your metal detector and shovel.
  • Historical scavenger hunt.  For history buffs there are plenty of obscure landmarks, sites, and wayside markers. Search for ancient arrowheads and Indian artifacts (good luck). Talk to locals about the history of the region.
  • Leave your mark.  But not on the antique fire hydrant. Trade for a free night or two and contribute to nature.  Ideas put to use are planting trees or wildflowers and/or to build a particular kind of birdhouse to attract new species to our neck of the woods.
  • Make a new friend.  Another camper, a host at Boondockers Landing, someone you may cross paths with at the country General Store or other folks while out fishing or paddling the river. Could be your next best friend, or gads, could be someone just like yourself.
  • An impromptu dip in the river after dark.  You might want to bare it all. What are you waiting for? Take the plunge!
  • Bring your remote controlled boats. Good for times when the river runs slowly. When the water level is low there are trails through the vegetation and stones that make this a blast for kids at heart. Be prepared to get wet — where are those red rubber boots?
  • Hot air balloon ride.  Full of hot air? Use it to elevate yourself sightseeing in a balloon. Does chasing a four-man-sized, bounding, lurching basket over hills and dales and holding it down so it doesn’t float off to Never-Never Land with the kids aboard sound like fun?  How about the initiation of a bottle of champagne over the head, poured, that is.
  • Puddle jumping and rain running.  Weather permitting, take a walk in the summer rain. Bring your favorite-colored, striped or polka dot umbrellas and listen to the rainfall. Be a kid again and have fun sloshing through the puddles. You may even get rained in (good one to tell your boss).
  • Extreme sports.  Are you an adrenaline junkie?  If you have a chemical imbalance in the brain, or have no brain, or this just happens to be your forte’ then go for it! And may you live to tell about the experience.
    • Hang-gliding. This activity is exciting and exhilarating and not for the faint of heart. For those that secretly wish they were birds. With technology a person can now glide for hours and many miles.  Avoid landing in trees and be sure you take a compass for your walk back, if not found.
    • Paragliding. Make sure a kite can hold your weight.  What goes up must come down. Convenient sport; store your chute, that you trust with your life, in a rucksack, along with a first aid kit.
    • Bungee jump. Who in their right mind or left, or is it the frontal lobe?, would climb to the highest peak, velcro rope around their ankles and then jump 1,000 feet?! Must be a try-out for special forces to test your mettle (metal, uh, er, velcro, that is).
    • Ziplining. Zip your zipper and zip the zipline! Best entertainment on cable.  Soar a mountain canopy for excellent scenery if the views on the ground aren’t good enough.  Course is challenging and diverse.  Over one mile of flying on six different lines, and a walk on a swinging, daring sky bridge.  There is an "ending" to fun.
    • Rock climbing. Oh, ah, ooh, this is a good one if you like large rocks because that’s what it takes for climbing mountains of boulders in the Ouachita Mountain region. Why not just ‘skip’ the rocks and live a few more days?
    • Bow fish for alligator gar.  Challenge the sport by hunting in a canoe.  Good aim and balance will level the playing field.  Now, try it at night. Oklahoma’s record gar caught was a whopping man-eating size of  279 pounds and over 8 feet in length.
    • Wild hog hunting.  Nocturnal, challenging activity for night owls, insomniacs and zombies that enjoy living life on the edge.  We have seen these beastly creatures on night camera.  Zip your tent.
    • Go squatchin’.  Do you like the challenge of hide-and-seek? Bigfoot is still the world's reigning champion. Are you a Squatcher?  Hit the trails for Big Foot.  The Urban Dictionary defines “Gone Squatchin’ as, “Entering wild lands in search of evidence for the Sasquatch, the legendary Bigfoot, a large bipedal primate sighted in many parts of the USA.”  Sighted just up the road from Boondockers Landing!  Will you be alone in the dark?
    • Alligator hunting.  Go for a guided, spooky night trip on a backwoods swampy slough for alligator.  The adventure begins with searching for the glowing eyes and to watch their ensnaring movements so you know when to start paddling. 
    • Okie noodling.  Have you ever wondered what it feels like to be fish bait? Try your hand (or foot, which ever you prefer to lose) at Okie Noodling. Object of the sport: ‘Reach or dive down deep underwater into a dark hole and wiggle your fingers or toes as bait hoping that a monster-sized catfish will clamp down so you can pull it out of the hole, without getting pulled in yourself’.